Month: February 2020

Black Suit Combinations

White shirt and black tie

If you want to appear totally classic, go for a white shirt and a black tie. This is traditionally a formal look, but you can make it look more or less casual depending on how you wear it. For example, an elegant pair of cufflinks and a sleek hairstyle can dress up a black suit and black tie, whereas some leather bracelets and a disheveled hairdo (think Johnny Depp) can make it appear more casual.

Blue shirt and blue patterned tie

This combination is perfect for when you want to wear your black suit, but don’t want it to appear too dramatic. A good example of this would be at a job interview. A light to medium blue shirt will help to soften the look of the suit a bit. Look for a tie with the same shade of blue in it, along with other complimentary colors. For example, a foulard tie in shades of blue and green would work well, or a striped tie in blue, yellow and black.

White shirt and red, orange, or yellow tie

You’ve likely seen politicians in this combination before, and that is because it generally says “business.” This is a look that commands attention and respect. It is a good look to wear if you are heading up a business meeting or have an important presentation or proposal to make. And make sure your tie knots perfectly straight if you really want people to take you seriously.

About Classic Eyeglasses Frames

Men will make passes at ladies who wear cat-eye glasses! Since their inception around the 1940s, these timeless eyeglass frames haven’t wavered! Their style may have evolved but, for the most part, cat-eye glasses have stayed a popular choice for fashionable women looking for a bit of an edge in their frames. The classic retro-style saw a bit upsurge in popularity in the early 2000s when all-things vintage and pin-up girl-related items became extremely fashionable! Thankfully, these frames have outlived other trends and continue to be a fashionably – and classical – choice for most women today.

You can’t go wrong with a simple pair of plastic rectangular eyeglasses. They’re the little black dress of eye glasses! These are a staple for most people and one of the most commonly purchased style of eyeglasses. They’re a little bit retro, a little bit modern, and they look good on just about everyone – which makes them extremely versatile! Today, this style of frames comes in a multitude of colors to dress up or dress down any outfit. Additionally, as lens sizes increase and decrease depending on the individual needs, the classic rectangular style stays fashionable no matter what! From the early 1950s until today, this is one style that will never wane and really can go with everything!

Another great style of frame that you can label as classic is the metal frame – regardless of the shape. What matters here is color! Not every color can look good on everyone! For instance, silver and pink shouldn’t be worn by people with extremely light skin or gray hair. Yet, colors like bronze, gold, black, and gunmetal are known to be classic metal frame shades and you can pair them with just about anything!

For people who choose to wear more than one pair of eyeglasses, the classic style may not register on their radar of the perfect eyeglass style. Yet, for the rest of us who really only want to buy one pair of eye glasses online, the classic eyeglasses style is perfect! Since classic eyeglasses frames, by nature, are meant to go with any outfit, any hair color, and any facial type, their versatility is a big win for anyone!

History of Fancy Dress

Although it is not known precisely where the phrase ‘fancy dress’ actually comes from, we can trace the beginnings of costume wearing to the masked balls of the 18thcentury in aristocratic England. These balls were very elaborate affairs, and were restricted very much to the aristocracy and ‘nouveau riche’ of the day. Often the costumes were very elaborate, but sometimes a simple ‘masquerade mask’ was worn in front of the eyes. Of course this kind of ‘dressing up’ was only practised by a very small percentage of the population, as the cost of costumes was prohibitively expensive for working class people.

During the Victorian era dressing up became more popular, and whilst it was generally the preserve of the upper and middle classes, towards the end of the century more and more working class folk also began to dress up in costume. Of course, for this particular class the costumes were pretty ‘rough and ready’ affairs and were home-made using left over scraps of material.

The popularity of fancy dress continued to rise during the first half of the twentieth century, and started to become far more common during the 1940s. During the 1970s in the UK, fancy dress parties became a far more popular way of celebrating birthdays and special events. However, the cost of buying costumes was still prohibitively expensive and so the vast majority of party goers would hire their outfits from local stores. Whilst the quality of such costumes was generally very good, the range of costumes available to consumers was very limited.

This all changed in the 1990s with the rise of globalisation, and the ready availability of cheap costumes manufactured in the Far East. This coincided with the rise of online shopping, and these two factors together meant that, for the first time, consumers could buy a wide range of fancy dress costumes at very affordable prices. Suddenly it was just as cheap to buy a costume as it was to hire one!

Since then the fancy dress industry in the UK has grown exponentially, driven partly by the cheaper costumes but also the growing popularity of events such as Halloween. Indeed Halloween has become such big business now that it has generated its own industry in the UK.

Cashmere Sweaters

Brand appeal and consciousness has really caught on big time and the eagerness to wear branded stuff is not limited to garments like cashmere sweaters only. Fashion accessory items like purses, scarves, bags, glasses and even caps are catching the attention of individuals.

In the midst of all these developments, the allure of the cashmere sweaters, cardigans and other knitwear items has remained at its peak with more and more people seeking to buy them. In the past, lack of awareness as well as cost considerations kept many away from such luxuriant items. But in the recent past, better disposable incomes and growing awareness has led to its growing popularity.

Cashmere sweaters are unique in the sense that they are wonderful to wear in both cold and hot weather conditions. They are very effective in providing warmth and comfort in winter and at the same time, due to its unique fabric attributes, enduring the heat of summer too becomes a breeze. They are made out of the fine hairs found on the underbelly and neck areas of the famous mountain goats in China, Tibet, Mongolia and the Himalayas.

It requires mention here that this wool is not something that is in abundance or something that is available through the year. It takes many shearing instances to get the required mass of wool and that explains the high cost as well as exclusivity of cashmere as a material.

Each and every one of these cashmere sweaters is fashioned out of the very best of cashmere wool. The increasing demand for this item has prompted manufacturers to make them available in a wide range of colours, sizes and patterns. There is also better accessibility to the consumers with many high end retail stores and malls now stocking them. The steep cost of these cashmere sweaters is no longer a deterrent for people looking for a quality product.

Cashmere sweaters are also being bought online. The sheer convenience of online shopping has compelled many retailers to put up these items for sale and also offer excellent discounts. This has led to a definite increase in sales volume and consumers are discovering the wonderful feel as well as sophistication of these items.

Notwithstanding the fact that these cashmere sweaters are long term purchase items, you need to take good care of them. Maintenance is a simple affair and you only need to ensure that you do not subject them to any machine wash as that would disturb the fine fabric threading and may possibly deform the shape of the sweaters.

Shopping Destinations in Asia

The Street Bazaar

Top Shopping Destinations in Asia The bazaars are a long-held tradition in much of Asia, and there is nothing like it in the West. Typically the bazaar is made up of hundreds of small vendor stalls selling handcrafted items, unusual imports and goods designed to capture your attention. It is easy to spend an entire day in a single bazaar, so come prepared. If you plan on doing some heavy shopping, bring a suitcase with wheels or a large backpack to hold all of your treasures. Most of the bazaars will also feature local food stalls, making your day at the bazaar a great opportunity to also sample some of the local cuisine.

Designer Goods and Shopping Malls

Top Shopping Destinations in AsiaIt’s not all local stalls and bazaars in Asia though. In places like Singapore, Thailand, Hong Kong, and the larger cities in mainland China, you’ll find huge, air conditioned and ultra-modern shopping malls with high-end designer brand names, and even familiar Western restaurant chains. Singapore for example, has malls everywhere, and Bangkok’s Emporium shopping center is a study in elegance. Hong Kong of course boasts some of the most upscale malls in all of Asia, and if you’re in China and love shopping, you can’t pass up going to Beijing just to see the Golden Resources Shopping Mall, aka “The Great Mall of China.” The largest shopping mall in the entire world, it boasts over a thousand shops and plenty of luxury brands. And of course, for elegance and upscale shopping, Tokyo’s Ginza district is a must-see.
Bargaining

Top Shopping Destinations in Asia

If you’re in a trendy boutique in a glitzy shopping mall, the clerk’s not going to bargain with you over the price of a Fendi bag, but in the smaller local shops, street stalls and bazaars located throughout Asia, it’s a skill you’ll need to learn.

Many local vendors are peddling hand-made crafts, and so they have a lot of leeway in pricing. Don’t feel like you need to pay the “sticker price”. In fact, many vendors will not list a price at all, instead quoting a price only after they size up the depth of pocket and relative gullibility of the individual buyer. It helps to know a few key phrases in the local language, but many shopkeepers do speak multiple languages. It’s not unusual to hear a single vendor holding multiple conversations over the course of just a few minutes in Hindi, English, and Thai.

Even if there is a language barrier, vendors have a way of making themselves understood. Typically, if there is a language barrier, the vendor will have a pocket calculator so they can key in the price to show you. You can still bargain even if you don’t speak the language-hold out your hand for the calculator, and then key in a lower price and hand it back. Proceed this way until you strike a deal.

Better yet, if you have a friend that’s a local, bring them along. Vendors usually have a “tourist price” and a “local price,” and your friend can typically ask for the “local price” on your behalf.

Beware of Scams

Top Shopping Destinations in Asia There are terrific and legitimate bargains everywhere, wonderful hand-crafted treasures, and plenty of friendly vendors at every bazaar. But there are a few things to look out for.

First of all, taxicabs recognize a tourist with money when they see one, and taxicab drivers will typically derive a second income by feeding tourists to certain vendors in exchange for a commission off the sales. As such, a cab driver is usually not the best person to ask for advice on a shopping destination. Another common scam is when you ask the driver to take you to a tourist destination, and they respond that “they’re closed today” because of some special national event that is usually nonexistent. They “just happen to know”, however, that there is a special government sale on gemstones going on, with below-wholesale prices, and they would be happy to take you there! Of course, the gemstones are not real or are of very poor quality,

Also, counterfeit goods may be prevalent in certain bazaars, so if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you want to buy a Prada handbag, go to a licensed retail outlet. You can find what looks at first glance to be Prada handbags at bazaars in Cambodian border towns, from street vendors in Bangkok, and in some of the back streets of Hong Kong and Beijing, for the equivalent of about five dollars-but they’re not the real thing, and there’s a chance you may have it taken away by the customs agent when you go back home.

Know the customs rules

Top Shopping Destinations in Asia You can buy a full tiger skin in Burma, a jar of dried bear’s gall bladders in Cambodia, and carved ivory in Thailand, but you can’t bring it back home with you. Also, if you have your eye on picking up an original Buddha carving from the Ayutthaya period to decorate your living room, think again. In Thailand, taking Buddha images and other religious objects out of the country requires a special permit. Throughout Asia, you will find antique shops with wonderful bits of history for sale, but depending on where you are, taking certain types of antiquities out of the country may be problematic.

Shopping in Greece

Nearly all Greek cities have large international-style shopping malls with well recognized brands and retailers. But prices are similar to those in other parts of Europe, so you won’t find any real bargains unless sales are underway.

Tourist souvenir shops and some family-owned arts and crafts stores tolerate haggling, but otherwise it is frowned upon. In places where bargaining is accepted, you can reduce the price by at least 10-20%, and being able to speak some Greek can help you get price as low as possible.

The official currency is the Euro, and other currencies will not be accepted, but you can easily exchange money in the larger cities and in any tourist destination. Banks usually offer the most favorable exchange rates and automated currency exchange machines tend to offer the worst rates; specialist shops are somewhere in between. When changing money, try to get mostly smaller notes – nothing over a EUR50 – as many businesses are averse to accepting larger denominations.

ATM machines are ubiquitous. Visa, Mastercard and Eurocard are widely accepted in hotels, retail outlets and travel agencies, but some restaurants and local souvenir shops will not accept them.

Most items incur Value Added Tax (VAT) and this is generally but not always included in price tags. However, some shops do provide tax-free shopping for non-European Union residents. Under this system, people who do not live in the EU can seek a VAT refund when departing the EU. To do this, ask for a VAT voucher when buying an item and show a customs officer all such vouchers and the related items upon leaving the EU.